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Things / Objects in Japanese


Things / Objects in Japanese


Around March, I discussed Loans' words for things. In today’s blog, I will be posting about Japanese objects or non-living things.

If you want to check the Loan words, you can check with this link:


In the examples in my previous post about loan words, all the words are borrowed words that were translated using the Katakana sound. Today, it will be the Japanese words of each English word, like Table. Table when translated as part of a loan word, will be テーブル. But the Japanese word for Table is  , read as ひょう (Hyou).  

 
Object or Thing is Japanese is もの () read as Mono.

 Let’s check some things below:

Things

Japanese

Romaji

Table

ひょ ()

Hyou

Desk

()

Tsukue

Chair

(椅子)

Isu

Cabinet  

(戸棚)

Todana

Box

()

Hako

Books

()

Hon

Paper

()

Kami

Bags  

()

Kaban

(It can also be translated as バッグ(Baggu) – Bag)

Scissors

Hasami

Pencil  

(鉛筆)

Enpitsu

Telephone

(電話)

Denwa

Cellphone

(携帯電話)

Keitai Denwa

Radio

Rajio

Television

Terebi

Clock  

(時計)

Tokei

Pants  

Pantsu

(It can also be translated as (Ji-nzu)– Jeans)

Dress

Doresu

(It can also be translated as (Wan Pi-su) – One piece)

Shoes

 

()

Kutsu

Coats

Ko-to

Underwear  

(下着)

Shitagi

Plates

()

Sara

Cups

()

Hai

Spoon

Supu-n

Fork  

フォ

Fo-ku

Knife

Naifu

Umbrella  

()

Kasa

Raincoat

Rein Ko-to

Rainboots

Rein Bu-tsu

(It can be translated as (長靴)  (Nagagutsu)– Boots)

Hat

(帽子)

Boushi

Scarf

Suka-fu

(It can also be translated as (Mafura) – Muffler)

Car

()

Kuruma

Bike

しゃ (自転車)

Jitensha

Bus  

Basu

Airplane

(飛行機)

Hikouki

Ship  

()

Fune

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This is Ringo.

See you Soon. 

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If you want to check my previous post, you can check it through the link below:

>> Tech Gadgets Name List in Japanese
>> Japan’s Golden Week

For Hiragana and Katakana page, please check the link below:

>> The Hiragana Character
>> The Katakana Character

For Word of the Week page, please check the link below: 
>> Word of the week 3
>> Word of the Week 4

For YouTube Videos:

>>Japanese Words| Hiragana | I-adjectives

For my Spanish lessons that I am still not fluent and need more effort to study, you can check the link below:

>> 【Spanish Lesson #1】Survival Expressions

You can also my personal website where I write stories and blog about things I like:

>> Write and Sleep

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