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Japanese Loan words for Things

 


Loan words 


Let’s talk about Loan words for Things.

 

Today’s post is about Loan words associated with things or objects. Japanese has many loan words or borrowed words from different countries but mostly English words. These borrowed words are usually words that do not have Japanese words or words used for Japanese expression or syllables.

The Japanese for loan word is called Gairaigoがいらいご (外来語). The Gairaigo words usually refer to foreign words. Gairaigo words are mostly written in Katakana.

Wasei-eigo わせいえいご (和製英語) means words that are only available in Japanese, and it doesn’t have a standard English meaning. Wasei-eigo words are usually a combination of English words that are only available or made in Japan.

I once watched an episode of a Japanese TV show asking Japanese about some Wasei-eigo and if they know if the words are available in English or if it’s from the English Language. I was also amazed while watching them because most of them taught that the words they are using were from English words expressed in Japanese syllables.  Like, マンション (Mansion).  When Japanese people say they live in マンション, we would think they live in a big house in a big hectare with a lot of space, having many rooms, bathroom, etc. But no, マンション in Japan means an apartment or a condominium type building.

For this post, I will only write Gairaigo words of Things or Objects.


ENGLISH

GAIRAIGO外来語

ROMAJI

Handle (Steering wheel)

Handoru

Handkerchief

Hankachi

Glass

Garasu

Desk

Desuku

Table

Te-buru






ENGLISH

GAIRAIGO外来語

ROMAJI

Personal computer

Pasokon

Computer

ピュ

Konpyu-ta-

Keyboard

Ki-bo-do

Ballpoint pen

Bo-ru pen

Ball

Bo-ru

 

 

 

 





ENGLISH

GAIRAIGO外来語

ROMAJI

Mobile

Mobairu

Smartphone

Sumaho

Telephone

フォ

Terefon

Calendar

Karenda-

Ticket

ット

Chiketto

 

 








ENGLISH

GAIRAIGO外来語

ROMAJI

Camera

Kamera

Television

Terebi

Microphone

Maiku

Kitchen paper

ッチ

Kicchin pe-pa-

Scarf (Muffler)

Mafura-


 

 

 





ENGLISH

GAIRAIGO外来語

ROMAJI

Alcohol

Aruko-ru

Tobacco, cigarette

Tobako

Punching bag, sandbag

ッグ

Sandobaggu

Blazer

Bureza-

Pants

Pantsu

 

 

 

 





ENGLISH

GAIRAIGO外来語

ROMAJI

Elevator

Erebe-ta-

Escalator

Esukare-ta-

Air conditioning

Eakon

Bike

Baiku

Skateboard

Sukebo-

 

 

 

 





ENGLISH

GAIRAIGO外来語

ROMAJI

Supermarket

Su-pa-

Department store

Depa-to

Building

Biru

Hotel

Hoteru

Restaurant

Resutoran

 

 

 







That’s all for today. 

This is Ringo.







See you soon!


 

 

 




Note: All photos are licensed under CC BY-NC, using Microsoft PowerPoint 365.


If you want to check my previous post, you can check it through the link below:

>> Let's talk about Nature
>> Welcome 2022
>> Let's talk about names in Katakana form



For Hiragana and Katakana page, please check the link below:

>> The Hiragana Character
>> The Katakana Character



For my Spanish lessons that I am still not fluent and need more effort to study, you can check the link below:

>> 【Spanish Lesson #1】Survival Expressions
>> 【Spanish Lesson #2】More Examples



You can also my personal website where I write stories and blog about things I like:

>> Write and Sleep

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