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Fruits in Japanese

 Let’s talk about Fruits in Japanese


Who loves fruit? I do. I am a fruit person. So, for today’s topic, let’s talk about fruits and the Japanese names of each fruit.

(果物) is Fruits in Japanese, read as Kudamono. It can also be translated in its Katakana sound (Furu-tsu).

When I went to Japan, fruits are expensive. とても高いです。(とてもたかいです。) It is very pricey (expensive). Maybe because many fruits, especially tropical fruits are imported to Japan. But the focus of todays blog is the Japanese translation of each fruit.

Below is the list of fruits that I know the Japanese words for:

Fruit Name

Japanese

Romaji

Mango

マンゴー

Mango-

Apple

りんご リンゴ

Ringo

Banana

バナナ

Banana

Grapes

ぶどう

Budou

Orange

オレンジ

Orenji

Mandarin Orange

ミカン

Mikan

Strawberries

いちご

Ichigo

Avocado

アボカド

Abokado

Pineapple

パイナップル

Painappuru

Peaches

もも

Momo

Japanese Plum

うめ

Ume

Cherry

さくらんぼ

Sakuranbo

Japanese Persimmon

かき

Kaki

Tomatoes

トマト

Tomato

Blueberries

ブルーベリー

Buru-beri-

Papaya

パパイヤ

Papaiya

Watermelon

スイカ

Suika

Lemon

レモン

Remon

Pears

なし

Nashi

Guava

グアバ

Guaba

Melon

メロン

Meron

Durian

ドリアン

Dorian

Coconut

ココナッツ

Kokonattsu

Jackfruit

ジャックフルーツ

Jakkufuru-tsu

Lychee

ライチ

Raichi

Of all these fruits, マンゴ is my favorite fruit even though my name is リンゴ.  If I will choose between マンゴ and リンゴ, I will always choose マンゴ. So, should I change my name to マンゴ? Lol!

Apple can be written either in Hiragana りんご or Katakana リンゴ character. Same with Strawberry. いちご can also be written as イチゴ. ぶどう which is Grapes can also be written as ブドウ. I input the Katakana characters for fruits that are loan words except for ミカン and スイカ as both words are spelled in Katakana sound. These two are the Japanese words for Tangerine (mandarin orange) and watermelon.

I have a funny memory about スイカ. One of our clients, he is Japanese and he kind of confused スイカ as a loan word or words derived from English. He asked his co-worker whether スイカ is an English word because it is written in Katakana characters. Most words that are written in Katakana characters are borrowed words so he thinks that スイカ is also a borrowed word. We all laugh (it was a fun memory) because he insists that it’s a borrowed word. We all had our laughs.



For a better image, you can check the picture library in the link:  

Pictures: Fruits in Japanese




That’s all for today.
I’ll see you soon.

This is Ringo. 



If you want to check my previous post, you can check it through the link below:

>> Things / Objects in Japanese
>> Japanese House

For Hiragana and Katakana page, please check the link below:

>> The Katakana Character
>> The Hiragana Character

For Word of the Week page, please check the link below: 

>> Word of the week 5
>> Word of the week 6

For YouTube Videos:

>>Japanese Words| Hiragana | I-adjectives

For my Spanish lessons that I am still not fluent and need more effort to study, you can check the link below:

>> 【Spanish Lesson #3】Vocabularies

You can also my personal website where I write stories and blog about things I like:

>> Write and Sleep

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