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Japanese House




Let’s talk about rooms of a Japanese house

 

The Japanese house layout is my forte. I work in a Japanese company that focuses on house plans and estimation. I’ve been to Japan a couple of times and went as a trainee twice in a construction company. I saw how they construct houses and buildings and experienced their work ethic. Anyway, I will more about my travel in Japan in a different blog. As for now, let’s proceed in discussing each part of a Japanese house.




Let’s start withずめん (図面), it is the house plan or drawing. へいめんず(平面図) is the detailed plan view or floor plan while りつめんず(立面図) means elevation. When you say floors or the floor levels, the Japanese term is かい(), like 1F (first floor) is 1, 2F is 2, etc.


English

Japanese

Romaji

House plan (Drawing)

(図面)

Zumen

Plan view (Floor plan)

(平面図)

Heimenzu

Elevation

(立面図)

Ritsumenzu

Floor level

()

Kai



House is いえ () in Japanese. じたく(自宅 ) means one’s home.


English

Japanese

Romaji

House

()

Ie

One’s home

(自宅 )

Jitaku



きそ(基礎) is the foundation. かべ () is a wall. やね (屋根) is the roof.  ゆか () means flooring. The Japanese house aside from its foundation (基礎) is made from woods (lumber). From Post (Pillar) which is はしら(柱) up to its rafters which is たるき(垂木) in the Japanese are all built of wood.

When you say outside or external side, the Japanese word is がいぶがわ (外部側) while inside or internal is ないぶがわ (内部側).


English

Japanese

Romaji

Foundation

(基礎)

Kiso

Wall

()

Kabe

Roof

(屋根)

Yane

Floor (Flooring)

()

Yuka

Post (Pillar)

(柱)

Hashira

Rafters

(垂木)

Taruki

Outside (External)

(外部側)

Gaibugawa

Inside (Internal)

(内部側)

Naibugawa



とびら () means door in Japanese but we mostly used ドア which is the Katakana sound of the door. The entrance is げんかん (玄関). If you say Entrance door, its Japanese equivalent is げんかんドア (玄関ドア). A window is まど () in Japanese.


English

Japanese

Romaji

Door

()

Tobira

Door

Doa

Entrance

(玄関)

Genkan

Entrance Door

(玄関ドア)

Genkan Doa

Window

()

Mado




List of Rooms or spaces in a house below:


English

Japanese

Romaji

Room

(部屋)

Heya

Room

()

Shitsu

Bedroom

(寝室)

Shinshitsu

Western-style room

(洋室)

Youshitsu

Master’s Bedroom

しゅ(主寝室)

Shu Shinshitsu

Children’s room

(子供室)

Kodomo Shitsu

Japanese-style room

(和室)

Washitsu

Study room

しょ(書斎) 

Shosai

Family room

ファ

Famiri-ru-mu

Free space

Furi-supe-su




English

Japanese

Romaji

Entrance

Entoransu

Shoe-in-closet (SIC)

シュ

Shu-zu kuro-ku

Atrium

(吹抜)

Fukinuke

Hallway

Ho-ru

Hallway

(廊下)

Rouka

Living room

Ribingu

Living room

(居間)

Ima

Dining room

Dainingu

Kitchen

ッチ

Kicchin

Pantry

Pantori-



   

English

Japanese

Romaji

Storage room

(納戸)

Nando

Storage room

しゅ(収納)

Shuunou

Closet

ット

Kuro-zetto

Walk-in-Closet (WIC)

ウォ ゼット

Uo-kuin Kuro-zetto

Family closet

ファゼット

Famiri-kuro-zetto

Closet

(押入)

Oshiire

Altar (Buddhist Altar

(仏間)

Butsuma

Under stair storage

しゅ (階段下収納)

Kaidan Shita Shuunou


   

English

Japanese

Romaji

Washroom

    (洗面脱衣室)

Senmen Datsui Shitsu

Bathroom

(浴室)

Yokushitsu

Bathroom

Basuru-mu

Laundry area

Randori-

Laundry room

(洗濯室)

Sentaku Shitsu

Sunroom (for Laundry)

Sanru-mo

Toilet

Toire

Handwash Room

 手洗室)

Tearai Shitsu



English

Japanese

Romaji

Balcony

Barukoni-

Stairs

(階段)

Kaidan

Porch

Po-chi

Wood deck

ッドッキ

Uddodekki

Garage

Gare-ji

Bicycle parking lot

ちゅじょ         (駐輪場)

Chuurinjou




I'll see you soon on the next blog. 

This is Ringo











If you want to check my previous post, you can check it through the link below:

>> Let's talk about Loan words for things
>> Let's talk about Nature


For Hiragana and Katakana page, please check the link below:

>> The Hiragana Character
>> The Katakana Character


For my Spanish lessons that I am still not fluent and need more effort to study, you can check the link below:

>> 【SPANISH LESSON #4】THE VERB “TO BE”


You can also my personal website where I write stories and blog about things I like:

>> Write and Sleep

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