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Days, Weeks, Months of the Year in Japanese


Last time, I posted about numbers. You can check it here: Lets talk about numbers 

 

For today’s post, I will write about the Days of the week and month. As well as the Months of the Year.

 

I.                    Let’s start with the days of the month. As usual, I will not be going to use the Kanji for each days but its Hiragana equivalent.

 

Days

HIRAGANA

Romaji

1st

Tsuitachi

2nd

Futsuka

3rd

っか

Mikka

4th

っか

Yokka

5th

Itsuka

6th

Muika

7th

Nanoka

8th

Youka

9th

Kokonoka

10th

Tooka

11th

じゅ

Juuichi

12th

じゅ

Juuni

13th

じゅ

Juusan

14th

じゅっか

Juuyokka

15th

じゅ

Juugo

16th

じゅ

Juuroku

17th

じゅ

Juushichi

18th

じゅ

Juuhachi

19th

じゅ

Juuku

20th

Hatsuka

21st

じゅ

Nijuuichi

22nd

じゅ

Nijuuni

23rd

じゅ

Nijuusan

24th

じゅっか

Nijuuyokka

25th

じゅ

Nijuugo

26th

じゅ

Nijuuroku

27th

じゅ

Nijuushichi

28th

じゅ

Nijuuhachi

29th

じゅ

Nijuuku

30th

じゅ

Sanjuu

31st

じゅ

Sanjuuichi

 

When using the days of the month, include the word ‘にち’ after each days. ‘にち’ means day in Japanese. But, not all days need to have にち. The first 10 days, 14th, 20th and 24th day don’t need にち when reading, writing and using it.

Example:

                6th day of the month – むいか

                11th day of the month – じゅういちにち

                20th day of the month – はすか

                29th day of the month – にじゅうくにち

 

II.                 Next, will be the Months of the year. It is easy to remember the months in Japanese because we will be using the Japanese counting numbers plus the word month in Japanese. がつis the word that is included when reading the months of the year in Japanese. がつ means month (also moon when read as つき).

 

Months

Hiragana

Romaji

January

Ichigatsu

February

Nigatsu

March

Sangatsu

April

Shigatsu

May

Gogatsu

June

Rokugatsu

July

Shichigatsu

August

Hachigatsu

September

Kugatsu

October

じゅ

Juugatsu

November

じゅ

Juuichigatsu

December

じゅ

Juunigatsu

 

III.               Next is the days of the week. When reading the days of the week, always include the Japanese word that indicates week which is ようび. ようび means week.

 

Days of the week

Hiragana

Romaji

Monday

Getsuyoubi

Tuesday

Kayoubi

Wednesday

Suiyoubi

Thursday

Mokuyoubi

Friday

Kinyoubi

Saturday

Doyoubi

Sunday

Nichiyoubi

 

Examples:

                March 20, Tuesday – さんがつ はつか、かようび

                April 9, Friday – しがつ ここのか、きんようび

                May 26, Wednesday – ごがつ にじゅうろくにち、すいようび

  

Normally, months and days are written in Kanji but because I haven’t featured Kanji lessons yet, that’s why, we will stick to writing Hiragana.


You can also download the days, weeks and months:

>> PDF Copy of Days, weeks and months of the year

 


That’s all for today.

 

See Yah!


 

 




If you want to learn my previous post, you can check it through the link below: 

>> Lets talk about numbers

>>【Spanish Lesson #2】More Examples

>> Summary of my previous post

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